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." >> a second explosion at the damaged fukushima at -- power plant and 11 people are injuried. japan offers assurances that risks remain low. tens of thousands of people are still missing amidst the race of trying to find loved ones. >> hello and welcome. also in this program, japan's stocks tumble. they take emergency action by pouring in cash to the market. >> japan's nuclear crisis appears to be deepening. in the last few hours, there has been a second explosion at the fukushima nuclear plant. speaking in the last hour, japan's cabinet secretary said the risk of today's explosion caused an uncontrolable leak of radiation is low. but the u.s. said it had moved away from the area after one of its aircraft carriers detected low-level radiation 160 kilometers off shore. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from the area. let's go to my correspondent who is in japan in the sendai area with all the very latest. >> hello to you. you join me on the outskirts of sendai city. this main wall behind me is where the wall of tsunami, sea water, washed up about a half a mile from the harbor
. thousands killed. and thousands missing in an earthquake and tsunami of epic proportions. when it hit, japan shifted 8 feet. 15-mile-per-hours later, 30-foot waves smashed into the northeast coastline. this tsunami from hell stretched across the pacific and in its wake a cascading nuclear crisis spins out of control. hello, i'm shepherd smith reporting from tokyo, japan for fox news reporting. over the past ten days, a nation of 127 million people faces what their prime minister says is the most severe crisis since world war ii. japan, of course, is no strange to disaster. both manmade and natural. in 1923, 142,000 people died in the tokyo earthquake. but today, the nuclear meltdown is having global repercussions, threatening lives, the economy and the environment. yet in the midst of it all, the human spirit to survive endures. a look at how the first ten days of this disaster in japan unfolded on fox news. march 11, 2011. just a normal day in japan. in the middle of the night in the united states. >> the union losses who have played such a huge role apparently -- >>> this is a fox news ale
. myers. i promise you. stay with cnn for the latest on what's happening tonight in japan. coming up tonight at 10:00 eastern, i'll be watching, hope you will as well. anderson cooper hosting a special edition of "a c360" live from japan. now to my colleague wolf blitzer in paris traveling with secretary of state hillary clinton leading up to "the situation room." wolf? >>> prook, thanks very much. happening now, we're following breaking news. a new reactor breakdown adds to fears of a nuclear disaster in japan. u.n. experts insist there's no sign of a meltdown right now, but over the past few hours we've seen another explosion, a radiation spike and almost constant danger. it's 6:00 a.m. tuesday morning in japan, and rescuers are racing against time. we're with the crews searching for survivors and bodies. over three days after that monster quake and tsunami, and the other major story we're following right now. libyan rebels, they are retreating. they are being defeated in some key towns. we're keeping the spotlight on moammar gadhafi's brutal fight to hold on to power. i'm in pair
>> hello, everyone. welcome to special coverage of the latest events in japan. >> here's what he's happening at this moment. fears grow of a meltdown at the fukushima nuclear power ant in japanfter a second explosion at the damaged facility. fuel rods and another reactor in fukushima are the u.n. regular agency says no chain reaction is taking place there. japanese engineers are stepping up efforts to prevent a meltdown at the nuclear power plant damaged in last friday's earthquake. the fukushima plant has been hit by two explosions. the latest happened early on monday. rapidly falling water levels have expos fuel rods in another reactor, increasing the risk of a core meltdown. >> it's the third day of japan's nuclear crisis, and the situation at the fukushima power plant remains critical. now there has been a second explosion there. aerial footage shows two damaged reactor suctures. a surveillance camera captured the moment of the blast which blew apart the concrete building surrending the number three reactor. the japanese government says this was a hydrogen explosion. >> we as
edition of "world business today" as cnn continues its coverage of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. >>> sea walter being poured from helicopters on to japan's damaged nuclear reactors. that is the scene on thursday. engineers attempt once again to avert catastrophic radiation leaks. the japanese military is dropping tons of water on to two of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant trying to cool the plant's fuel rods. but the company that runs the plant now reports that the radiation levels actually increased. they're also bringing in police, water cannon. officials say radiation levels right now are too high for personnel to venture inside. >> translator: spence force conducted a spring of water from the air. and the police are also going to start the water spraying by the water cannon trucks. so we're trying to combine the two approaches to maximize the effect of water spraying. >> hundreds of thousands of residents in the area have been evacuated. many are seeking refuge in public shelters. japan ordered people to move at least 20 kilometers away from the plant.
in japan. and just moments ago, a somber message from japan's emperor in a rare but brief public address live on television. the emperor said he was praying for the safety of those affected by last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. the japanese government is telling residents within a 10-kilometer radius of a second nuclear plant to evacuate. meanwhile workers have returned to the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant after the government lifted a plant evacuation order because radiation levels were dangerously high. concern continues to grow over the safety of spent nuclear fuel rods at that facility. and authorities are investigating the cause of white smoke or possibly steam rising from the plant's number three nuclear reactor. a top government official says radiation levels around the plant still fluctuate, but it's unclear why. >> translator: one thing i would like to confirm, now this increase in radiation reading and in number three reactor, the containment vessel is it possible that the containment vessel has failed? well, number three reactor needed to have water injected. an
." >> this is bbc world news today. fears that thousands may have died in japan's earthquake and tsunami and concern is growing about radiation leaks from the clear power stations. authorities in japan are on alert about a possible nuclear meltdown after a second explosion in 48 hours at the fukushima plant. the rescue and relief operations struggle to help half million left homeless. whole communities are wiped off the map. >> every patch are around here, another home to another family. all obliterated. what is left? just a book, bits of a doll, a lamp, and a coffee maker. that is a lamp. >> the disaster also brings economic uncertainty as factories stopped and the stock market slumps. we assessed the impact on the world's third largest economy. arab gulf states send troops into bahrain to help quash anti- government protest. rebels say it is a declaration of war. gaddafi's forces bombing key places and libya as they try to win back the countries east. hello, and welcome. it is being described as the worst disaster in japan since the second world war. the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck
with gregory jaczko, chairman of the nuclear regular rah story commission, on japan's nuclear crisis and his agency's response. then more on the nuclear situation in japan as we take you live for a briefing of the nuclear regulatory industry. and later the cato institute has a conference marking the first anniversary of the signing of the health care law and it impact on the industry, the federal budget and the economy. >> tonight on c-span2, actor harry sheerer talks about the media's coverage of his adopted hometown of new orleans. he recently released a new film about hurricane katrina and louisiana called "the big uneasy. "it examines the causes of the city's flood after the 2005 hurricane. 7:15 pacific. >> tonight on c-span3, a white house summit on bullying featuring remarks from first lady michelle obama and president obama who discusses his own experiences with bullying as a child. >> as adults we all remember what it was like to see kids picked on in the schoolyard, and i have to say with big ears and the name that i have, i wasn't immune. [laughter] i didn't emerge u
in japan's history an emperor gone on television to address a national crisis. the emperor akihito told the japanese people not to lose hope three reactors damaged at the plants. this is a view up above. that is reactor three on the left-hand side of your screen and reactor four in the middle. if you can determine that. radiation levels surged after that white cloud of smoke was seen coming from reactor three. the fear there is a crack in the steel and concrete shell that insulates radioactive material as cnn stan grant tells us, even nuclear experts are stumped by this white cloud. >> they are looking into exactly what has caused that and they are still working on whether this consumption vessel that surrounds the core of the nuclear reactor holding in the more nasty radioactive substances has, in fact, than breached. this is an ongoing concern. they have assumptions about what is happening but they can't get in and have a look at it. remember, as well, the work is from the plant today workers from the plant today were forced to evacuate themselves and after a fire in the reactor numbe
prefecture. self defense forces say they found a young man eight days after the earthquake hit central japan. rescuers found the man in the collapsed house on saturday morning. he was immediately taken to a hospital. the self-defense forces say a young man has been rescued in miyagi prefecture eight days after the earthquake hit. the man was found in a collapsed house on saturday morning. he was immediately taken to a hospital. our best wishes for his recovery. >>> at the troubled in fukushima , the fight continues to fight the radiation hazard. it will resume the operation in the afternoon. tokyo electric power company is making efforts to restore power to the cooling system. the tokyo fire department began spraying water into the storage pool into the number three reactor building early on saturday morning. it suspended the operation after spraying water for 20 minutes to connect electricity cables. five fire engines and 13 firefighters were the at site. one truck has a 22 meter discharging arm.the firefighter to resume spraying on saturday afternoon. they have left the hose in place so
>>> welcome back, everyone, to our special coverage of the disaster in japan. i'm michael holmes. >> we want to welcome our viewers in north america as well. it is 1:00 p.m. in japan. and there seems to be no letup in the fear that's gripping the disaster stricken nation. tokyo is now requesting help from the u.s. military in this emergency. we want to bring you all we know so far. japanese officials say part of a nuclear reactor containment vessel at the fukushima daiichi power plant may be damaged. they say a breach in the containment vessel in reactor number three may be what's caused a white cloud of smoke or steam to rise above the power plant. they can't confirm either way on that. now, already, there have been several explosions and fires at the plant since friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. workers have been trying to stop a nuclear meltdown by cooling those damaged reactors from which radiation has escaped. however, officials say workers have now suspended their operations, and have been evacuated. authorities also say radiation readings at fukushima daiichi have b
to be riveting, we appreciate your morning. it's monday just after 9 a.m. hour and now japan's stock market open for trading and investors watching closely, with serious concerns about the impact worldwide, the nikkei average fell nearly 2% and more losses expected for monday and if the disaster potentially costing billions of dollars in insurance losses, could that affect our insurance premiums at home. the fox business network's robert gray watching the markets. >> they're watching where they left off and keep in mind the quake hitting before the close of trading on friday and didn't have a full day to basically factor this into the shares and the nuclear opening just minutes ago at the top of the hour there. it's down 2.1% now, as more of the shares are traded. there was a flood of sell orders and big names talking sony, talking about nissan, honda, toyota that it was not fully impacted and now seeing the nikkei down about 4% and losses in new zealand and australia the first two markets to open on monday. they were down, but now the nikkei down 4% here and we're also seeing the dollar taking
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
are coming out with adoration for japan which is strange because they have been enemies of japan and they are not getting along. just before the earthquake is it chairman mao went, you know what, guys i have have to come back, we have been robbed. i believe the traditional allies in the world are switching places. a strange case of musical chairs, the axis of the earth is changing. tonight, i will focus on japan but we're not going to focus on the economy side, the economic side is getting worse by the day and honda announced it will not re-open plants in japan. sony put their plans to re-open on hold. and louisiana is being affected. g.m. is shutting a plant down in louisiana because they cannot get parts from japan. the worst part is, we're in the doing anything to get us on track. we as a people have to decide. we have to decide. this is the point of the show tonight. who are we? what can we control? we cannot control the government. we foe that. we know they are trying to control us. we can still try to hold their feet to the fire. but we can control one thing in life. us. ou
. >> the u.s. department of energy specialisterize now in japan. and berkeley-nuclear engineer are installing a radiation detector on campus although they insist there is no radiation problem here. john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the earthquake damaged the nuclear reactors in japan is raising eyes about california's nuclear reactors. ktvu's mike mibach is in san francisco with what he learned. >> reporter: right here outside of pg&e headquarters, one of the power plants. tonight in this earthquake prone state they are calling for more studdies. >> reporter: california's nuclear power plant, today images from the filt near sacramento closed in 1989. officials say nuclear fuel remains on site. >> a small amount measurables. >> reporter: the nuclear power plant creates 15% of the state's electricity. it's designed to with stand a 5.5 magnitude quake. >> the structure where we pull in ocean cooling water for the cooling source is designed to with stand a tsunami up to 45 feet. >>> fault was detected a half mile away from the plant. >> we along with the usgs discovered the shoreline fault. >
. >> a new warning from japan's prime minister after another explosion and fire rocked daiichi power plant. >>> hello, 6:00 in the east, i'm christine romans. >> i'm kiran chetry. thanks for being with us. we are trying to dissect some of these new developments. it's very unclear exactly what is happening in japan. we do know there are growing health concerns due to another explosion at their nuclear power plant at daiichi. >> and as this unfolds, you have stock markets around the world plunging. japanese stock market down 10%, european markets down all very, very sharply. we'll continue to watch what that means in the united states where stocks here are also expected to open lower. >> and all of this fears of a nuclear crisis in japan and may be founded this morning. there are several new disturbing elements to tell you about. one the prime minister is admitting that radiation levels have reached levels that can "impact human health." what that exactly means, we still don't know this morning. everyone, though, within about 12 miles of the facility have been told to remain indoors. that's
at a nuclear plant in japan grows my dire by the hour. tonight, the warning from the united states top nuclear chief. plus, the workers who stayed behind and put their lives on the line. i'm shepard smith live in tokyo. the news starts now. they fight their way through radiation and dodge explosions in the dark. risking their own lives for their country. the unseen heros who may be japan's last line of defense against an even bigger disaster. meanwhile, an emotional reunion for one quake survivor. but search crews also finding more victims. and one relief worker says the situation at the shelters is getting desperate. >> the stores are empty. nothing is getting through here. >> shepard: plus, an american who lived through the quake and tsunami finally gets word to her family. now, the battle to bring her home. most experts say the radiation will not reach the united states. lots of americans apparently are not listening. tonight the iodine rush and the reality check. good thursday morning from tokyo just past 8:00 a.m. where the situation is devolving quickly. there is now no water, according
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
japan'is's eye view of damaged nuclear plant. the effort to cool it goes on. people living near this facility flee for safety. japan fears as many as 15,000 may have died. welcome to "bbc world news." forces come to's benghazi. he delivers a radio message. >> we are coming on this happy day. tomorrow, benghazi will change and there will again be a fun, dance, and cries of joy. >> has japanese nuclear engineers battle to prevent a disaster, there is no let up. half a million people made homeless by friday's earthquake and tsunami. more supplies are reaching survivors. many still lack basic necessities. dozens of the evacuation centers have been set up. thousands were forced to flee from the nuclear exclusion zone. >> they come seeking refuge. fleeing tradition of's nuclear plant -- fukushima's nuclear plant and carrying what is most precious to them. there is a chance for radiation. more than 1000 have arrived here already. there are reunions. exhaustion and relief. this family was just 5 miles from the damaged reactor. as they made it here, the fuel in their car was running out.
a catastrophic nuclear event in japan today. this is a critical time now. at this hour, there are reports that four of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi plant are in danger of melting down. perhaps most worrisome are the spent fuel rods in number 4. a top u.s. official warned that the rods are now exposed. a claim that japanese officials later denied. >> in addition to the three reactors operating at the time of the incident a fourth reactor is under concern. we believele there's been a hydrogen explosion in this unit due to an uncovering of the fuel in the fuel pool. we believe that secondary containment has been destroyed. there is no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe that radiation levels are extremely high. >> that does not sound good at all. the japanese government has been trying to cool all the reactors, pumping water into the plant and trying to drop water from helicopters. that had to be abandoned because of rough winds and the radiation threat. there are reports that some workers are getting sick already from radiation exposure which is not surprising. experts
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
in libya. also breaking news on the deteriorating situation in japan. so welcome, once again, to "american morning." it's been a week now since all of this happened. the tsunami, the earthquake, the number of dead in japan continuing to rise as hopes fade of finding any more survivors amid the rubble. in the meantime, the radiation concerns are spreading, as well. crews are now desperately trying to cool down fuel at one nuclear reactor. the number of dead has climbed to 6,500 people. and the search grows more frantic with 10,000 people still missing. >>> turning to fast-moving developments in libya, stopping gadhafi. britain, france, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be ta
disaster in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live as fox reports with a special edition tonight. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdown and power plant operators using sea water to cool down the reactors. trouble in at least two power plants, the fukushima plant rocked by at least one explosion and the facility where radiations levels were up, but now told they've returned back to normal levels. japan's prime minister talking about the disaster the tsunami disaster and his words through a translator. >> in the 65 years since theened of world war ii, this is the toughest, the most difficult for japan in the period. >> harris: want to put up on the screen the newly released satellite images. and this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before and after. before on the left side, after on the right. that is before the tsunami driven mud and ripping out so much of the coastline on the right-hand side and the government confirming more than 2500 buildings in that coastal city destroyed. the earthquake's magnitude now elevated, scientists estimating a bigger magnitude, stronger, 9.0 is
powerful earthquakes ever recorded followed by a mind numbing deadly tsunami. updates from japan and united states throughout the hour. fox number two, turmoil in the middle east has spread to the world's largest oil producer. as the day of rage in saudi arabia and the question is whether its preview of things to come. fox number three, president obama tells american families what he might do about gas places. chris wallace breaks it all down for us. breaking news has changed everything on studio "b". >> it is almost impossible to believe. one of the most powerful earthquakes in history has rocked japan and unleashed a tsunami, threatening coast lines from the pacific islands to the shores of hawaii and washington state and california. all eyes on pacific ocean. we'll start with japan. >> shep: it's just unbelievable. every time i see these pictures, it can't be happening. the images are stunning. a massive wave. a rising of the sea that experts say is racing to land at one point more than 500 miles miles an hour. and tsunami washed away entire towns, boats, cars and homes and hundreds and
, because obviously, we are concerned about what is happening in japan. >> thank you, i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement, but i would like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year, and you went there, and now the tsunami off of the coast of japan and the waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. secondly, you also touched on possible assistance from the united states to japan, and japanese government publicly said that japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you waiting to provide those assistance? >> the answer to the second question is yes. i told prime minister kan that we will provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is that the main assistance that we will provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions
not clear why. >> the smoke rose from the reactor 3. workers temporarily evacuated the facility. japan's nuclear authority said it did not know what was burning,ut there w no explosion. the government tried to reassure the public. >> radioactivity near the reactor has not increased, despite the smoke. we should not forget that even non-hazardous material can catch fire. we must stay calm. >> the operators of the facility are facing more complications. news has emerged of negligence of the plant. a routine inspection was missed just before the quake. components of the cooling system were not checked. oldis and refiters continued to douse the reactors with water on monday to keep them from overheating. the power has been connected to the control center for reactor two. that means the cooling pumps may be restarted. in tokyo, people fear of contaminated food and reactivity 27 times higher than normal has been detected in milk and spinach. the government stopped shipments of food from there. the consumer and vice hot lines are busy. >> i understand your concern. please watch the vegetles t
an earthquake and tsunami slammed japan and we're still getting new video from the day of the disaster. a man if you check this out was driving along the coastal highway last friday when the tsunami jumped the sea wall, swamped his car. his car floated in to a parking lot, but he managed z to get to safety. >>> japan's nuclear agency today raised the fukushima disaster to crisis level five on a one to seven scale. this puts it on par with the three mile island nuclear accident back in 1979. but it is still below the chernobyl disaster which topped the scale at level seven. >>> crews are using helicopters, fire trucks to pour tons of water on the nuclear plant for a second day now. while they try to cool the plant, electricians are trying to hook up a new mile long power line to bring the cooling systems for two reek reactors back on line. >>> people who fled the coast are beginning to trickle back. you can imagine when they see what is left of their homes. >> translator: i have no words to express my feelings. i lost my mind. we will have to start from zero. >> here is a look at what's ahead
." >> there are more setbacks in japan's battle to prevent a nuclear meltdown. another fire was discovered in the number four reactor wednesday at the fukushima daiichi power station damaged by last week's earthquake. officials tell us this fire can no longer be seen. it caused radiation to spike to about 167 the level people are no normally exposed to in a year. that's according to the international atomic energy agency. all six reactors are now experiencing problems. they've been hydrogen gas explosions in reactors one, two and three, and authorities believe there may have been a breach of the containment vessel in the third react are tore. readings near the plant's front gate are fluctuating by the hour but the chief cabinet secretary says, as we just heard there, it's currently not a risk to people's health. >>> and, meanwhile, power station staff who are critical to the operation at the daiichi plant have returned. they were forced out early wednesday when radiation readings shot up to dangerous levels. well, the united nations nuclear watchdog says about 150 people around the site ha
are watching "world one." >>> coming up, one week after japan was hit by an earthquake and then a tsunami, efforts to stop nuclear reactors from overheating are going ahead nonstop. >>> a moment of silence in the tsunami zone, over 6,000 people are now known to have died, and over 10,000 are still missing. >>> and for the people who have survived, life still tough. not only homeless, many of them are also short of basic necessities. >>> we begin in libya where rebels desperate for help have been given help after an historic vote at the u.n. the future of libya remains uncertain, but the international community has spoken and the message could be a game-changer for moammar gadhafi. richard roth has details on the diplomatic action from new york. >> reporter: it was a dramatic cliff hanger, susan rice had to work the phones to win enough support for passage of a resolution authorizing a no-fly zone over libya backed by military force. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel gadhafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop, and the people of libya
. >>> and in japan, engineers struggle to restore power to crippled nuclear reactors. they hope to get it flowing this weekend and restart the reactors' water pumps to cool hot, nuclear fuel. but nuclear plant workers may be paying a heavy price for getting those electric cables reconnected. power company officials now say they will allow workers to be exposed to 250 millisieverts of radiation before pulling them off the site. that is more than 80 times what someone living in a developed country is naturally exposed to in one year. but officials say they are trying to prevent a catastrophe. anna is joining us from our tokyo bureau with more. much work going on there and many more workers trying to get the job done, anna. >> reporter: that's right, natalie. we have some information. a new operation has just got underway. we know there are water pumps sucking up water from the ocean. that truck is then pumping water to a nearby truck, which has an extended arm, some 22 meters high. and this water, this continuous flow of water, is being sprayed in to reactor three. this, of course, is the number on
. >> the situation appears more bleak by the day. >> dual disaster crippling japan. >> earthquake victims force today move away from the nuclear site as the crisis continues to get worse. >> radiation levels south of the plant spiked to 300 times the normal level today. >> pictures of smoke coming out of one of the reactors. >> new ruptures and fires releasing yet more radiation into the air in northern japan. >> none of us had any traces of radioactivity. when they checked our shoes, they did find. >> good thing or bad thing? >> that's a bad thing. >> inside the plant, those brave workers are still on the job. >> photos show extensive damage at three of four reactors there. >> plant workers in shifts of 50 are back at their posts. >> the fukushima nuclear plant for nearly an hour. >> 45 minutes later said they were allowing workers back. >> they crawl through the lib rinths of equipment in darkness with only their flashlight. >> there's the race to help victims homeless in a cold, japanese winter. >> nbc's lee cowan çmade it ba to tokyo. temperatures have dipped well below freezing, it is snowing
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
on this site, there are life threatening doses of radiation. >> japan's emperor addressed his nation today. an extraordinary event reserved for times of war or dire national crises. he says he's touched by the japanese people's calm and order in the face of disaster. >>> well, foreigners scrambled to leave tokyo today. france is urging its citizens to get out now or at least head to southern japan. japan has lost control of fukushima. evacuees say they don't trust the japanese government to be forthcoming. >> i don't believe what i've been told. you know, people are evacuating. all foreigners are evacuating, large multi-national companies, foreign companies are evacuating. you don't really know what to believe. it's better to play it safe. >>> harrowing new video of the moments the tsunami struck. people scream as they try to outrun the water. >>> this is said to be ground zero for the tsunami. a coastal town home to 17,000 people. most are feared dead. a cnn i-reporter sent us this video at the moment the 9.0 earthquake struck. shot it at a tokyo department store. remember, tokyo is 230 m
, alarm. the nuclear warning level in japan is raised as these brave men march head long into the worst nuclear disaster of the century. the faces of the heroes of fukushima, unknown, unnamed, facing certain exposure to radiation levels on the rise. their story, just ahead. >>> and this hour, a new crisis developing on the sands of north africa. the united states and its allies, great britain and france, along with other arab nations have now made it clear to libya's dictator, colonel gadhafi that his offensive against rebel forces is over. air asefsets of great britain a france are being rushed to the region to enforce a new no-fly zone and five u.s. navy warships are steaming off libya's coast, set to take offensive action to enforce it. the president's speaking at the white house just a short time ago, said there would be no negotiation and that colonel gadhafi had to cease attacking his own people or pay the consequences. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolu
. the american-led bombing of libya. and the nuclear crisis in japan. one major question about the assault on libya, what happened to the media's skepticism? u.s. war planes hitting targets in libya for a second day today and i have to say this at the outset. the media get excited by war, the journalistic insulin starts pumping as we talk about cruise missiles and put up the maps and have retired generals on and sometimes something is lost, reminds me of eight years ago when shock and awe was reigned down upon baghdad and the media failed to ask questions. i looked at my "new york times" this morning and looked at my "washington post" and didn't see any editorials about the no-fly position. to newspapers don't see the excepty cal questions. what are if they are american casualties? do you stop this operation with gadhafi still in power? these are the questions we need to be asking. to help us answer them. rome hartman, former executive producer of the cbs news. and jamie mcentear, founder of the line of departure blog and former correspondent for cnn. where are the skeptical questions? >>
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
." >> new pictures to have quake-stricken japanese nuclear plant. japan's central bank injects billions of yen into financial markets for a third day to ease the impact of last week's quake. welcome to bbc news. welcome to our viewers around the globe. britain and france draft a u.n. resolution calling for a no-fly zone. tensions running high. two protesters killed after bahrain declared a state of emergency. hello and welcome. the japanese government has said workers are trying to stabilize the if you can jet streama plant have been forced to suspend their operations due to increased radiation levels. the chief government spokesman said the reactor may have suffered damage. white smoke has been seen rising from the building. a fire at the plant's number four reactor where spent nuclear rods were being kept has been brought under control. >> smoke rises from the number four reactor at the fukushima power plant believed to have come from a fire from a massive pool holding the fire rods. protected in steel and concrete. in the last few hours, senior government officials described how leve
>>> choppers in the air, water cannons on the ground, japan launches an attack on a crippled nuclear reactor hoping sea water can stop an unfolding nuclear catastrophe on this "american morning." i'm christine romans. welcome to "american morning." it's march 17th, st. patrick's day. >> st. paddy's day. you are irish? >> somewhere am i irish. >> have you have green eyes. >> i'm irish. >> i'm kiran chetry. we're following the latest on japan's crisis. the focus is how to get the reactors cooled down, specifically reactor number three at fukushima's daiichi power station. military helicopters are dropping 30 tons of sea waters on the crippled reactor's pool. >> they're also spraying on the ground, up to a dozen water truxz a trucks are in place. the united states is telling americans to get at least 50 miles away from the reactor. >> there is one more critical development to watch for, engineers are planning to begin the process, which is key in this whole thing, of restoring power to the daiichi complex. they want to bring in external power lines to try to get the plant's cool
cannot confirm. >>> and we continue to follow the nuclear crisis in japan as the pressure rises inside the reactor at the fukushima plant. we want to welcome the viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm natalie allen and this is cnn "world report." coalition forces are taking action to try and stop libya's leader from attacking his people. officials say allied planes and missiles have taken out about 20 libyan air and missile defense targets since saturday. there you can see the skies lit up with anti-aircraft fire. they say civilians are paying a heavy price. libya reports 48 dead and more than 150 injured. cnn is not able to confirm those figures. u.s. says they will assess the damage done so far in libya. but gadhafi isn't known for giving in to international pressure. as expected he remains defiant. he says other nations have no right to intervene in libya internal affairs. he spoke on libya state tv as soon as there were the attacks. >> translator: all targets -- maritime targets will be exposed to real danger. lithuania and north africa. because of this aggression a
their efforts to try to cool nuclear reactors. >> ominous developments from japan tonight. within the past few hours, officials suspended efforts after a spike made it too dangerous for workers. they had to withdraw because of radiation. government officials say 70% of the fuel rods may have been damaged. they also said another fire broke out today at one of the reactors and radiation levels were high enough to cause severe radiation sickness. 3300 are confirmed dead. up to 450,000 are in temporary shelters. in the villages and towns where the tsunami hit, rescue workers are still looking for survivers. for miles and miles, there is debris and little is identifiable. fuel and water are in short supply. many are waiting in long lines to buy whatever they can. this line stretched for a half mile. it's the japanese way to remain calm, patient, and polite. >> jana is live in tokyo, and joins us via skype. what are you hearing in tokyo. >> reporter: it certainly is unsettling. in the past hour, it was 12:52. we had another aftershock. the hotel started swaying back and forth. i know understand, it
the devastation in japan but the nuclear crisis which gets more and more dire by the hour. toyota losing $73 million a day as a result of their plant closings and they're not the only ones sufficie s suffering . no market hit harder than japan's itself. the nikkei plummeting 16% over the past two days and as barry will point out, more than 20% from its levels prior to this crisis. all of those numbers, the worst they've seen in that country, since 1987 wall street had all sorts of common tear today including those who believe there is further room for weak innocence our markets that have run up over the past couple of years driven by frederal reserv money printing. what happen do investors are the rest of us ultimately anticipate will be effect of all of this? that is the question. joining us, ceo and exquity director. barry it looked like any asset that existed became worse less. oil, gold, everybody become worth less, why? >> the fear trade, the risk-on trade, people have a tendency to panic when they don't know what's going on. you don't know how to discount the impact of a possible nucle
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